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Cold Weather and Bugs!


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#1 NathansGal

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 01:11 PM

I've always been told that if it gets really, really cold (in Alabama or the south) it will kill "the bugs". I was never sure what species "the bugs" were but I took it to be mosquitos or gnats.

Well let me tell you, that COLD we received ALL of February didn't kill the mosquitos, I know for a fact because I battled with one halfway to WalMart Friday night. I won (the back of my hand against his...)! However, I feel (as does my power bill shows) that it should have been cold enough to kill something....

What's the truth about this??



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#2 Coach B

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 01:23 PM

Can't be the skeeters, cause the skeeters actually get worse the farther north you go.  They might not have them for as long, but they can be downright awful in the far North.

#3 Guest_duckfetchr_*

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 01:25 PM

I think Alaska has one of the worst mosquito populations anywhere doesn't it?

#4 NathansGal

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 02:05 PM

See, I knew that black bugs (that's what they call them) are HORRIBLE up North. However, I've heard all my life "I hope it gets cold so it will kill all the bugs"....I knew Artic even had bugs but I was thinking maybe they are used to the cold. Apparently the bugs here have found a way around dying in the cold....I give up! icon_sad.gif

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For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other created thing, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

"In a gentle way you can shake the world." (Gandhi)

#5 Vic

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:01 PM

They're talking about bugs that overwinter in the ground as grubs or in piles of vegetation. You would have to have a good deep ground freeze to get rid of the first.


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#6 CT_Yankee

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:13 PM

I had much more of an issue with mosquitos when I lived in CT...but I figured it's because I don't live near any water now.
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#7 k4nwx@hamilton

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:22 PM

1. A mild winter means more bugs during the summer.

Fact. It takes a hard freeze to kill off the bug population. That means that the temperature 18 inches deep in the soil must hit 26 degrees or below. Camilo says there is a direct correlation between a mild winter and a larger than average population of flies, mosquitoes and other lawn and agricultural pests............................................................................................................How wasps survive the winter
PARASITIC wasps siphon off antifreeze from their fly hosts to protect them from chilly winters—a discovery which could improve biological control of pest flies.

Nasonia vitripennis wasps deposit their eggs in puparia, the cocoon-like casings of developing flies. When the wasps hatch they feed on the fly pupae. To survive the winter cold, both flies and wasps go into diapause—a form of hibernation in which they accumulate antifreeze compounds.

But the wasps don't go into diapause until up to two months after the flies. To try to explain this, David Rivers of Loyola College in Maryland and his colleagues studied how the host's diapause affects parasite hardiness. They found that wasps reared on diapausing pupae could tolerate lower temperatures longer than wasps reared on pupae of hosts that hadn't entered diapause.

And diapausing pupae contained twice as much of the antifreeze glycerol as non-diapausing pupae. Because glycerol levels in parasites ...

The complete article is 352 words long.
To continue reading this article, subscribe to New Scientist. Get 4 issues of New Scientist magazine and instant access to all online content for only USD $4.95

Edited by K4NWX, 06 March 2007 - 03:31 PM.


#8 NathansGal

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:43 PM

QUOTE(K4NWX @ Mar 6 2007, 2:22 pm)  
1. A mild winter means more bugs during the summer.

Fact. It takes a hard freeze to kill off the bug population. That means that the temperature 18 inches deep in the soil must hit 26 degrees or below. Camilo says there is a direct correlation between a mild winter and a larger than average population of flies, mosquitoes and other lawn and agricultural pests............................................................................................................How wasps survive the winter
PARASITIC wasps siphon off antifreeze from their fly hosts to protect them from chilly winters—a discovery which could improve biological control of pest flies.

Nasonia vitripennis wasps deposit their eggs in puparia, the cocoon-like casings of developing flies. When the wasps hatch they feed on the fly pupae. To survive the winter cold, both flies and wasps go into diapause—a form of hibernation in which they accumulate antifreeze compounds.

But the wasps don't go into diapause until up to two months after the flies. To try to explain this, David Rivers of Loyola College in Maryland and his colleagues studied how the host's diapause affects parasite hardiness. They found that wasps reared on diapausing pupae could tolerate lower temperatures longer than wasps reared on pupae of hosts that hadn't entered diapause.

And diapausing pupae contained twice as much of the antifreeze glycerol as non-diapausing pupae. Because glycerol levels in parasites ...

The complete article is 352 words long.
To continue reading this article, subscribe to New Scientist. Get 4 issues of New Scientist magazine and instant access to all online content for only USD $4.95


Soooooooo....according to this and Vic....the nutshell the ground doesn't get cold enough to get to the hibernating bugs and some of the hibernating bugs have anti-freeze.....

Oh well.....here's to OFF! and those nasty smelling candles!! icon_sad.gif

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Romans 8:38-39
For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other created thing, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

"In a gentle way you can shake the world." (Gandhi)

#9 k4nwx@hamilton

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:45 PM

Cold weather can be good news in the South
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — While it was cold in Alabama on Monday morning — 14 at Huntsville, 17 at Birmingham and 25 at Mobile — the wave of arctic air is not unusual for this time of year and is in many ways a good thing for a state better known for summer heat.
"The basic ecosystem requires cold weather. Insects need to be culled out. Peach growers have to have a certain number of chill days," said state climatologist John Christy, a professor at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

Monday's frigid temperatures were only a gentle sample of what Mother Nature is capable of in Alabama. The record cold temperature for the state was 27 degrees below zero, recorded at New Market north of Huntsville on Jan. 30, 1966, Christy said.

This week's freezing temperatures were caused by a wave of arctic air behind a cold front that pushed across Alabama on Saturday, said Faith Borden, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service office in Alabaster.

The cold weather was very good news at Alabama's only ski resort, Cloudmont in Mentone, where snowmaking machines have been working overtime to take advantage of winter's first prolonged cold snap.

Even if they can't go skiing, Christy said most people like a few days of cold weather, even in Alabama.

"The typical person likes to think he lives in a place with four seasons," Christy said.

One of the best things about cold weather is that it helps control creepy, crawly critters like ants, roaches and mosquitos.

"A lot of insect populations are kept down by winter cold," said Milton Ward, an associate biology professor at the University of Alabama. But Ward said it takes more than just a cold day to kill most Alabama insects.

"It's the unusual hard freezes or periods of substantial duration that have the biggest effect. Most insects have adapted to surviving cold winters," Ward said.

Arthur Appel, an entomologist at Auburn University, said this week's blast of cold weather might be particularly effective at culling down the bug population because it came after a period of warmer than usual temperatures.

"The best thing that happens is for temperatures to drop very fast. One day it's 80 and the next day it's in the 20s. The more rapid the change, the more bugs get killed," Appel said.

He said one negative effect of the cold weather could be to drive some bugs that normally live outside to seek comfort inside homes.

"Argentine ants will come inside whenever the weather changes. It gets wet or chilly and they run inside very quickly," Appel said.


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#10 NathansGal

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 04:48 PM

Now I might be confused....

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Romans 8:38-39
For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other created thing, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

"In a gentle way you can shake the world." (Gandhi)

#11 HSV Comet

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 04:57 PM

bugs in this part of the world aren't bothered too much by cold. Even if they are would you even be able to tell.
Insects are reproducing machines and adjust to the weather accordingly. This mild spell will have them out in abundance.

#12 SWL

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 05:07 PM

I think I got bit by one earlier when I was outside.  icon_evil.gif First time in many months and it sucks.



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